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Welcome to the Pharmacist Resource Page of the Glaucoma Australia website.

A major concern for patients being treated for glaucoma is continuing to take their medication. Similar to other chronic, asymptomatic conditions, medication adherence amongst glaucoma sufferers is low, with 44% of patients having stopped treatment at six months and 52% at one year1.

This slide presentation is one of the resources available to assist pharmacists working to improve glaucoma medication adherence and can be downloaded and used free-of-charge.

download slide presentation to assist pharmacists

You can also order a Public Health Resource kit on Glaucoma Medication Adherence to use in:

  • Ongoing adherence discussions with customers being dispensed glaucoma medications
  • Planning and implementing an in-pharmacy Public Health Promotion
  • Delivering a Public Health Information session to an external group

The kit consists of the following:

  • Improving Adherence in Glaucoma – A Manual for Pharmacists
  • Glaucoma Management: Pharmacist’s Guide
  • Understanding Glaucoma: Patient Handout

Order your Public Health Resource kit here:

Order your Public Health Resource kit here

Suggestions for an in-pharmacy Health Promotion:

  • Decide how you will use the resources available – do you require anything else?
  • Design a display within the pharmacy
  • Provide training for pharmacists/other staff on the aims of your promotion
  • How will you use/distribute the patient pamphlets?
  • Develop a clinical audit tool to target 20 patients being dispensed glaucoma treatment and discuss the important aspects of the disease and their medication(s)

Suggestions for a health information training session:

  • Decide who your target audience will be
  • Plan what type of session you will run and how you will use the resources provided
  • How will you advertise the event?
  • Evaluate the learning or impact of your session with your audience

1 Healey P, et al. Loss to follow-up may be reason for poor glaucoma medication adherence. Poster: World Glaucoma Congress Paris, 2011.